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What's The Best Wine Cooler For Me?

Answer:
Buying the right wine cooler does not have to be hard. Purchase a wine cooler that caters to your various needs and future wine storage plans. What would you like to spend on your wine refrigerator? If you're looking to store a growing collection, you might want to spend more for a larger storage unit so that you will have the extra space when the time comes to expand your collection. If you are trying to conserve space, a smaller wine cooler might be the proper investment.

A built-in wine cooler integrates with the cabinets to take up as little space as possible. A freestanding unit can be designed small enough to fit on a countertop with other appliances. If you're storing more than one type of wine, it is suggested that you research dual and triple zone wine coolers. These wine coolers allow you to chill two or three types of wine in a single unit. They are usually larger than single zone units, so you will require more space.

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Do All Wines Require Special Storage?

Answer:
While wines vary in required storing temperatures, most wines have a set temperature range that they should be stored at. Some wines, like red wines require close to room temperature storage to taste their best. Red wines stored too hot will turn out dull. If they're stored too cold, they will often be strong and even bitter. The proper storing temperatures for red wines is around: 59°F - 65°F for a Full Red and 54°F - 57°F for a Light Red.

White and rose wines also have their own temperature requirements. These are the wines that your wine refrigerator will need to chill more precisely. The proper chilling temperature for white or rose wines is around 46°F - 57°F. Visit our Wine Chill Chart for a more detailed list of proper wine chilling temperatures.

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What Are Temperature Zones?

Answer:
Temperature zones play a big part in wine storage. These zones are used to control the temperature variations essential to your collection. A properly functioning wine cooler should maintain steady, even temperatures. It is wise to let your wine cooler run a full 24 hours after purchasing it. Make sure there is no wine stored at this time. After waiting, test the temperature within and make sure the unit has properly maintained the required temperature for your wine. This will prevent you from ruining your wine collection if the unit is not functioning properly or maintains improper temperatures.

A single zone wine refrigerator chills wine at one, even temperature throughout the entire unit. This is a good choice for anyone who only wishes to chill one type of wine. Single zone units often cost less money than dual or triple zone units. A dual zone wine cooler caters to two different types of wine storage. If you're a fan of a bold red wine at dinner, and a chilled white wine for desert, a dual zone unit will chill both types of wine at once. This keeps your two favorite wine types chilled and ready for any occasion. Larger collections, or wine enthusiasts wishing to experiment and taste new wine types, may want to invest in a wine cellar. These units cost more, but allow a variety of wine storage that caters to the curious wine taster.

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Will I Need A Built-In Unit Or A Freestanding Unit?

Answer:
Determining your storage options will help you to determine just what type of wine cooler you'll need. A built-in unit is typically installed under the counter in your outdoor kitchen . If you want a built-in unit, you will need to create, or already have, proper cabinet space to install the wine cooler beneath the counter. Take the proper measurements, even though most built-in units come in cabinet width sizes already. If you lack the cabinet space or proper area to install a built-in unit, you will need to invest in a freestanding wine cooler.

While easily positioned around the house, a freestanding wine cooler requires a bit more space for proper ventilation. Freestanding units can be built in, as long as it is properly ventilated. Shop wisely, and take time to browse all of the different styles. There are many options out there and selecting one should be fun!

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What About Larger Wine Bottles?

Answer:
Most wine coolers are designed to cater to standard-sized bottle storage, with a standard wine rack structure. Some wine coolers may include larger areas at the bottom or non-scalloped wine racks to help store bigger bottles. If you enjoy wines that roam outside of the standard bottle sizes, it is highly recommended that you invest in a wine cellar with adjustable or removable wine racks. Wine rack space is often limited vertically, so having removable wine racks will allow you to take away a shelf to accommodate larger wine bottles.

Make sure you have decided which types of wine you intend to store before you purchase a wine cooler. Doing so will save you from spending money on a cooler that does not have the required adjustable features to fit bottles with a larger circumference.

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What Is Thermoelectric Cooling?

Answer:
Thermoelectric cooling is another alternative to compressor cooling. Thermoelectric technology is often used in smaller appliances. During the operation of a wine cooler, only a small quantity of cool air needs to be produced. Thermoelectric technology helps to produce this air quickly, providing cooler wine temperatures with less noise and vibrations, making for near silent operation, which is an attractive feature for a wine refrigerator. Older wine cooling units may still use compressor cooling, which can be noisy at times.

Thermoelectric technology applied to wine coolers can make the price a bit higher, but the operation a lot more silent. If you plan to keep your wine refrigerator in a room that you use often, consider investing in a wine cooler designed around silent operation. If you plan to store your wine cooler in a basement or a room less used, save some money and go with compressor cooling. While it is a little more noisy, it will cost you less in the end.

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Wine Cooler vs. Beverage Cooler

Answer:
Wine should not be stored as cold as other beverages, therefore wine coolers are programmed to be set to a higher temperature range than a typical beverage refrigerator. A typical wine cooler is not made for temperatures below 46°. A beverage refrigerator was designed to keep drinks chilled and ready to consume without ice, therefore a beverage cooler adjusts to colder temperatures. Wines stored too cold may lose their flavor or even become bitter. Make sure the cooling unit you purchase for your wine is specific to chilling wines.

A more versatile approach would be a unit designed for cooling wine and beverages. These units have a wide temperature range to accommodate either. Storing both at the same time will either result in wine that is too cold or drinks that are too warm. A single zone cooler can only chill one type of drink properly.

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